An Interactive Look at Men’s Olympic Hockey Records, 1920 to 2014

The Men’s Ice Hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics starts on Wednesday. Want a crash course on some Olympic hockey records to impress your friends — or just need a refresher? Then take a look at these interactive charts, which give a snapshot of the most important records in men’s Olympic ice hockey over the past 98 years. 

 


While compiling this information, I found two records particularly eye-opening. First, the United States has been the runner-up in men’s Olympic ice hockey more than any other country. The U.S. lost the gold medal game — thus earning the silver — eight times in 23 Olympic tournaments. Six of those losses were to Canada, and two were to the USSR. 

Speaking of which, the other stat that gave me pause was that goaltender Vladislav Tretiak of the USSR has played in 18 games at the Olympics — and won 16 of them! Both of those marks are records as well. 

Did you find any of these records surprising or interesting? Leave a comment and let me know. ■

Follow Sal Barry on Twitter @PuckJunk

 

mm

Author: Sal Barry

Sal Barry is the editor and webmaster of Puck Junk. He is a freelance hockey writer, college professor and terrible hockey player. Follow him on Twitter @puckjunk

2 thoughts on “An Interactive Look at Men’s Olympic Hockey Records, 1920 to 2014”

  1. I’m surprised there aren’t more modern players on the Goals/Assists/Points chart.

    Thanks for posting all the info. Nice appearance by the NES Hockey guys, too!

  2. For me there are a couple of stand outs. First of all, with the decades of known cheating the Soviets/Russians have done (had “amateurs” from the army who showed up to a military rink each day to practice *eyeroll*, doping, etc.) I am surprised they don’t have more inflated stats over what they were.
    Second, that Harry Watson scored 37 goals in Olympic play (and they were all goals – no assists if you can believe it), but is a complete unknown – even here in Canada. That is simply mind blowing! Granted I think his accomplishments are forgotten due to how long ago it was when he played (Interestingly, last week I had a discussion about this with others in the collecting hobby which I argued with respect to star and super star players from that era who played for defunct teams and how the fact those teams were defunct, puts them at a disadvantage with being remembered by fans in modern day as compared to similar players from teams that still exist). We have a ton of Olympic accomplishments in this country (ok, so a ton of Winter ones), but that is one that definitely isn’t well known about, but should be.

    Third, that the numbers agree we’re the best!

    Go Canada!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *